You are currently viewing Greggs recalls frozen veggie cooks over contamination concerns

Recall

< div class=" inline_image image_size_full" data-attachment=" 235028 "data-sequence= "1" >< img alt= "Recall" src= "https://www.breadnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/greggs-recalls-frozen-veggie-cooks-over-contamination-concerns.jpg" dimensions=" (max-width: 1023px) 100vw, 780px" course=" lazyload "width=" 2448" height= "1224" srcset =" https://www.breadnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/greggs-recalls-frozen-veggie-cooks-over-contamination-concerns.jpg 480w, https://www.breadnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/greggs-recalls-frozen-veggie-cooks-over-contamination-concerns-1.jpg 600w, https://www.breadnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/greggs-recalls-frozen-veggie-cooks-over-contamination-concerns-2.jpg 780w" > Greggs is recalling the veggie bakes it makes solely for Iceland over fears they may include small pieces

of eco-friendly glass. The feasible visibility of the pollutant makes them unsafe to eat, stated the Food Standards Agency. The recall impacts the 310g dual pack of savouries with a best prior to day of 15 August, 20 August, 11 September, 12 September as well as 26 September 2021.

It does not impact the delicious products offered in the bakery giant’s stores

Greggs apologised for any type of hassle triggered and also included that “the safety of our food is of critical importance”.

“We take all issues pertaining to the manufacturing of our food incredibly seriously,” a Greggs spokesman stated.

“We are recalling some batches of our vegetable cooks, due to possible tiny pieces of glass. This 2-pack product is special to Iceland and therefore the recall is just applicable to products purchased from Iceland shops.”

Consumers are advised not to eat the products but return them to the shop where they were acquired for a complete reimbursement.

Point of sale notifications are likewise being presented in all Iceland shops.

Last August Greggs remembered specific sets of its two-pack frozen steak bakes, which are marketed in Iceland, over issues they consisted of plastic.

Leave a Reply